Posts Tagged ‘practical positive psychology’

Ways to use Positive Psychology Concept Cards: Ten ideas to get you started

 

General

You can use these cards in a number of ways to stimulate discussion; create commonality and motivation; and to identify agreed action. Some general ideas are:

  • Use the cards as they stand, the questions and the action points
  • Use a rating scale ‘To what extent is this present in our team/organization/group at the moment on a scale of 1-10? What would we like to be? How can we move towards this?’etc.
  • As a prioritizing tool. ‘Which five of these are most key to our future success/our development/our strategy?’
  • As playing cards. Each person has some. Someone starts by laying down a card they think is important (to the topic under discussion) explaining why they think so, the person who thinks they can build on this with one of the cards in their hand lays it down with ‘yes and…’. This is a cooperative card game, with no winners or losers.

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Introducing the Positive Psychology Concept Cards

The concepts reflect key findings from positive psychology research of things that make a positive difference to organisational life. Each card lists the benefits of the concept, provides three questions to stimulate discussion, and is followed by three pointers for development. Each is introduced briefly below, arranged in four groups.

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Barack Obama famously crowd-sourced the finance for his election campaign, a powerful example of the ability of new technology to create a great aggregate result out of lots of small voluntary actions. But this process is not as new as it seems: Sir James Murray used a similar approach to creating the Oxford English Dictionary, a project he began in 1897.

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This master class workshop will help you understand the most important findings from positive psychology and happiness research so you can help your clients reap the benefits.

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What is positive psychology?

Coined as a phrase by Martin Seligman as President of the American Psychological Association in 1998, positive psychology is the psychology of exceptionally good living. It embraces areas of study such as happiness; human flourishing; exceptional wellbeing; energy and vitality, meaningfulness and achievement. The switch in focus from psychology’s traditional concern with when things go wrong for people (mental or physical ill-health, poor educational performance etc.) to when things go right for people has resulted in a burst of new streams of research and new knowledge about the psychology of high performance in people.

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Difficult times loom ahead. Few of us feel at our brightest and most optimistic in the dark, cold days of January, February and March. How can we help maintain good cheer, hope and optimism amongst our staff, suppliers and customers? Here are some suggestions, maybe even a list of New Year resolutions!

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The good news is: Performance Management Works

‘ A hospital that appraises around 20% more staff and trains about 20% more apprasisers is likely to have 1,090 fewer deaths per 100,000 admissions.’[i] Many other studies have also found this strong relationship between performance management, appraisals and organisational performance. How come then, it is a disliked process in so many organizations?

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At Appreciating Change we believe in the power of positive psychology to transform workplaces by creating positive energy and engagement, to build on individual and organisational strengths and to help people co-create the future direction of the organisation. There are many ways to do this, as explained in my book ‘Positive Psychology at Work’, and here are a few which can be implemented quickly and easily:

 

1. Opening meetings with a round of recent success stories.

 

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